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A look at the last 20 years

Alex LaRosa

Alex LaRosa

Investment Advisor Representative

July 18, 2019

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The S&P 500 closed above 3,000 for the first time ever on Friday, July 12th. On this same date 20 years ago, the S&P closed at 1,399 while the world was preparing for a computer apocalypse known as “Y2K”. Well, we are still here, and the S&P 500 is now above 3,000 or about 116% higher. While that may not seem all that impressive at first glance, take a look at everything that happened during that time which negatively impacted the market.

  • 2000-The dot-com bubble
  • 2001-September 11th
  • 2002-Stock market reaches 5 year low
  • 2001-2003-Invasion of Iraq and Afghanistan
  • 2005-Hurricane Katrina
  • 2007- Housing Crisis
  • 2008-2009-Stock market crash and the Great recession
  • 2009-Greek Debt Crisis
  • 2013-The Emerging threat of ISIS
  • 2015-2016-Energy Crisis
  • 2016-Brexit Vote
  • 2017-Huricane Harvey
  • 2018-Concerns over a slowing economy and recession
  • 2019-Concerns over a trade war with China

Even with the all doom and gloom that ensued from these events the equity index was still able to more than double over the 20-year period. It is impossible to predict the future; however, the next 20 years are sure to have negative events as well. If you panic sold at any time during the last 20 years you most likely underperformed and are worse off than if you would have stayed the course. A diversified portfolio coupled with some downside protection may help you ignore the short-term pain and focus on the long-term gain. If you have questions about your long-term investments or would like to review your financial goals, please contact one of our advisors and we can help.

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A look at the last 20 years

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